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? because end of february are these elections. >> yes. the elections are, of course, more the campaign heading into the elections with all these noises, especially the end ecb noises that we hear from italy. that's going to cause concern that if italy does need help, how likely are they going to be to get it? in the years from 1993 to 2007 italy brought down its debt to gdp ratio to almost 100% and half of that time berlusconi is prime minister. it's not like berlusconi has a record of fiscal spending. >> no. but i guess also the times were different. >> the times were different but the interest rate was slightly higher than it is now. but the primary surplus of the country ran over that period which was an acceptable 3% on average is already right now reached once again. so all the parameters are in the right place and the only thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenab
lawmakers re-elected as japanese prime minister, a job he left five years ago. welcome to nhk world "newsline." shinzo abe is getting down to the business of governing japan for the second time. he says his new cabinet is taking all the challenges the country faces, including a sluggish economy and last year's disaster. abe explained in his news conference his cabinet is designed to overcome the crisis. he says reviving the economy is a top priority. >> translator: a strong economy is the basis of japan's power. reviving a strong economy is essential to japan's future. my cabinet will carry out bold financial policies, well-timed fiscal policies and a strategy to encourage private investment toward economic growth. my cabinet will carry out these economic policies and achieve results. >> are prime minister abe says he and his minister also devote energy to foreign policy. he says they will strengthen diplomatic and security policies. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south kore
's available to lead italy. he'll run for office in the upcoming election, but only for a party willing to push his agenda. >>> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi. he tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales, but u.s. shoppers may be running low on holiday spirit. and analysts say that they're spending less, as well. hi, everybody. welcome. merry christmas out there. thank you for joining us here on the show. what we're looking at today, we've got slightly quiet markets ahead of the u.s. open. what we're seeing, though, that all the markets are being called lower across the board stateside. the dow is being called a bit lower, nasdaq is being called a bit lower and the s&p 500 being called down by a bybit, as well. we saw markets coming off on friday stateside. pretty significant drops, as well, given that we now seem to be a clashing of heads between the republicans and the demo
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
've been asking you, our viewers, to send in your thoughts, your messages to elected representatives. so let's close tonight with some advice from one of you to washington. >> my message to all of washington for the new year is to set partisanship aside working on behalf of 100% of the voters, fix this mess you've gotten us into, bring a balanced budget to the table to grow this economy for the long term not the short term. >> there you go. for the long term, not the short term. >> there you go. i'm don lemon. happy new year to you. jooirksz . >>> hello, i'm don lemon and this is cnn's top 10 of 2012. we look at the stories that captured our attention, what we see as the biggest stories of the year around the world, in crime, money, weather and even the biggestscandals and later this hour, those stories chosen by you. anchor of state of the union, candy crowley, with the top ten political stories of 2012. >>> like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. impossible number of possibilities. catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like
not release him to pay off much in the last election? >> jason dick, emily goodin, thank you for being on "newsmakers." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we will show our conversation with luke messer today again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. coast chambers of congress are in -- both chambers of congress are in. the senate is in at 1:00 eastern time. votes are scheduled at 2:00 p.m. eastern. majority leader harry reid and minority leader mcconnell had set a deadline of 3:00 p.m. when they're planning to convene a caucus meetings and update members of the parties on a possible plan for taxes and spending on the new year. will bring you live coverage of the senate on c-span2 started at 1:00 eastern. in the house, the return of 2:00 p.m. you'll be considering a number of pieces of legislation. what the live coverage of the house here and c-span. next, retiring senator kent conrad reflects on his career in congress to. it is currently senate budget committee chairman and was first elected to the senate in 1986. this
slog. now less than six weeks after the election, more than a month before inauguration, two journalists at "politico" have published an ebook about the campaign focusing especially on the final 34 days. the end of the line, available only on-line is the last in their series of four ebooks on the 2012 contest. the authors are senior reporters jonathan martin and glenn thrush and they join me now. congratulation, gentlemen, on your book. >> thank you very much for having us. >> warner: let's just set the context for a minute. if you go back to say mid 2011, the conventional wisdom was president obama would have a very hard time given how bad the economy was, given how high unemployment was. what was your conclusion based on this reporting, about whether he and his campaign won this year, won this campaign or whether mitt romney's team lost it. >> i must dodge your question, but we think that it's both. that both governor romney failed to tell the story about who he was, to make the case for his candidacy and that president obama effectively preempted his ultimate attempt to do
to italians to embrace the spirit of cooperation in upcoming elections. >> tens of thousands of people showed up in st. peter's square to hear benedict's message, and millions to and in worldwide. >> tens of thousands of people turned out to hear the pope's christmas message. the square erupted in applause as the pontiff stepped out to address the crowd. he revisited one of the themes of his christmas eve message -- the wish for peace in the middle east. turning and i to syria, he called for an end to the conflict -- turning an eye to syria. the pope appealed to those responsible to stop the bloodshed and slaughter of innocent people. he called for dialogue in order to find a political solution to the conflict. the pope then delivered a christmas message in 65 languages. >> remind the world that true happiness lies in their hearts with hope and joy, for the savior has been born for us. >> for many in the audience, hearing the message in their own language was an obvious highlight. then came the blessing -- to the city and to the world. >> we are joined now in our studio by our religious affai
. >> this government would lead the country in a transitional phase, which would end with new elections. they could be presidential elections if the parties concerned agree to it, or parliamentary elections.% >> but what role syria's president assad might play -- on that brahimi said nothing. syria's opposition has already dismissed his suggestions. hope for a rapid end to the bloodshed seems optimistic. >> syria will be the special focus later this half hour. >> we will have a special report from the turkish-syrian border. in other news, u.s. president barack obama has broken off his christmas vacation to resume talks on the so-called fiscal cliff, taxes and spending cuts unless democrats and republicans reach a deal by new year's eve. >> nearly all the major players in those negotiations are starting to agree on one thing, and that is that a deal is virtually impossible by that deadline. senior officials say there is little hope of a grand bargain to shave trillions of dollars off of america's mountain of debt. >> applause for the bell at the start of the trading day is a daily ritual at the new
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and the question is whether it can support enough growth in the economy. >> paul: taxes are going up, we know that, spending, going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially re
stories of 2012 and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the re-election of president barack obama, politics on the national level headed in a decidedly liberal direction. so what happened? and what does it mean for the country going forward? joining the panel this week, "wall streetf journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward and not to cut spending, but to increase spending. it is explicit from historic 20% of gdp to 25% of gdp. rather than cut spending, raise taxes as necessary to support the spending. and i would say that is in fact the french model. the question is whether that model can produce enough growth to supp
any doubt in my mind. there are looking at the election of 2014 and 2006 to more than the people. thank you for your time. pfft host: good morning to you, elmer. what is your level of optimism heading into 2013? caller: i am kind of scared. the statement i went to bed, why do we not get in contact with george bush. i think he should be in here on the deal because it was him and that got us in this position we are in. he cannot even tolerate position said they have going on with our congress. if the people out here for us to be taking care of, if they have enough money to take over to another country the way they demonstrate, that is what we are in this position that we are in. i think we should get in contact with george bush and see if he can get us out of this. host: here is a piece in "the washington post." if there is a photo of the first couple greeting military personnel. this is the president remained largely out of sight golfing and spending time with his family. he left washington late on friday. a little progress has been made on the cliff talks, but at least the talkin
ran for and was elected to the congress. well, the election came before my book came out. but i was worried, and i thought it was a legitimate concern. and the senator should know about it. he said, don't worry. he said, you know, what are you going to find? he said everybody knows that my father had an affair with gloria swanson, and he said and i know my father wasn't an anti-semite. and whatever you find and whatever you write is going to be truer to the man i knew and love than what's out there. so i said, okay, i want full access to everything. i want full access to the family, to all the documents, to everything that's stored at the kennedy library in boston but has been closed to researchers, and you will see the book, you and the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it's between hard covers, not before. and i won't be coming back to you for permission to cite anything. whatever i find i'm going to use in the book. he said, okay. then it took 18 months to get this all in writing. [laughter] and i was off. i was off and running. and i found a
it to the congress. the outcome of the election came before my book came out. but i was worried and i thought it was a legitimate concern in the senate should know about it. he said don't worry. he said you know, everybody knows that my father had an affair. and he said i know my father wasn't anti-semite. whatever you find whatever you rate is going to be sure for the man i knew and loved them without their. so i said okay. i want full access to everything. i want full access to the family, two of the documents, to everything stored it became belaboring boston but spend close to researchers. and you will see the book come to you in the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it is between hard covers, not before. i won't be coming back to you for permission to cite anything. whatever i find them going to use in the book. he said okay. then it took 18 months to get the solid writing and i was off and running. and i found some more remarkable story that i even imagined i would find. i found the story of a man who spent his life moving back and forth have been an outs
for the senate? he said i want to show the world that a well run machine can take an office boy in the election to the senate and truman in's first term there is considered a senator from prendergast. even in his second term he develops more of a national reputation but he is not expert on any of these issues. so he gets in there and write from the beginning every meeting he has with people he says this is a terrible mistake. i'm not take enough and i'm not smart enough and april 13, his first day in office mates meets with the reporters at the capitol. he said voice if you pray for me now, i don't know a few ever had a load of hay fall on you but i feel the moon and stars and all the planets have fallen on me. good luck mr. president. truman says i wish you didn't have to come me that. host go. >> host: back to henry wallace is perhaps the unsung hero of your book and i know as oliver was saying thinking about working on a screenplay a while back about while this. this is one of the great counterfactual's of modern american history. what if wallace had gotten nominated in 1944? in your book, h
no one thought they would. in the last two elections, a majority of greek people did not vote for either of those parties. try to understand what it would mean if a majority of americans voted for night of the republicans or democrats. in the last election the two major parties of greece, new democracy and the socialist party together got under 40% of the vote. and the explosive new party is a party that is a far left wing party that is against all austerity programs and wants to solve greece's problems by taking wealth away from the traditional greek ridge. this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or . this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or 3% of thech . this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or 3% of the. this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or 3% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
government today. abe led his party to a landslide victory in the recent general election. a special diet session will be convened on wednesday afternoon to choose the successor to outgoing prime minister yoshihiko noda. abe will be elected prime minister by voting in the upper and lower houses. he will be the first japanese prime minister in 64 years to be given a second chance. abe was prime minister for one year until he resigned in september 2007. abe plans to immediately start forming his cabinet. he'll hold a news conference in the evening to lay out his government's visions. the new government is not short on challenges. one urgent task is restoring the country's economy. japan's debt is projected to reach $12.8 trillion by next march. the ratio to the country's gross domestic product is 226%, the worst among developed nations. abe has pledged to halve the fiscal deficit by march 2016. the new government intends to finance its spending without borrowing by fiscal 2020. they hope to achieve the goal by cutting expenses. this would involve squeezing social security costs. all eyes ar
the results are wrong. i will continue protesting peacefully until our demands are met. >> egypt's election commission says nearly 64% of voters approved the constitution in tibia will rounds of balloting, a clear majority, but the overall turnout was only about 33%. with the official results in, the constitution's islamists supporters are looking ahead. the muslim -- the muslim brotherhood's freedom and justice party says it is time to focus on the challenges ahead. >> this is a priority for us. in addition, we want to discuss with other parties concerning what other laws are implemented in order to speed up economic reform. >> the president ordered the upper house of parliament to convene. elections for the lower house have to be held by the end of february. >> in russia, a bill banning american citizens from adopting russian children has won final approval from parliament there. >> president vladimir putin has already hinted he will sign it. angry citizens gathered in front of parliament to protest. they say children should not become victims of politics. the ban 1 unanimous support in t
wall street doesn't want you to know. plus, it goes down as the most expensive election in history. the role dollars and donations played in the race to the white house. and, americans spent a staggaring amount of money at the box office this year. a look at what we watched. but first, matt shapiro, president of mws capital, joins us now for a look back at the standout stocks of 2012. good to have you on the show this morning. > > thanks a lot angie. > definitely facebook was the leader of the pack. it was the third largest ipo ever, and one of the worst opening days ever. > > what a typical disaster for today's vacuous electronic markets. but, if you held off, remember, it was $18.75 before its last earnings report, and bounced all the way up. so, not only was it the worst ipo, but, it was a story rebound stock. and it's kind of the age of 2012, was these big tech stocks. which one do you buy and where do you buy it? > there were good times and bad for apple. at one point it was the must-own stock, and then it was "you must sell quickly before the end of the year and take home you
when jacques chirac the leader of the nacional he was second in the french election. so the socialists were out even though it was relative prosperity. they have gone backwards rather than forwards. what you have seen and i think this is exceptional is that the green there's the rice of the golden don, the neo fascist party. it's not mass political success. so i think you can say it's minor protest rather than a serious movement towards right- wing of what we saw in the 1930's. >> professor, thank you very much to dom see us. well, let's stay with europe because it was a subject that the government suffered an embarrassing defeat in the house of commons. the rouse was over the budget. it was due to be discussed in november and david cameron said he wanted it frozen. but many of his own benches believe that didn't go far enough. and instead of the increase, they wanted a real terms cut. the day started with some robust exchanges as the labor leader challenged mr. cameron over his stance. >> at a time when he's cutting the education budgets by 211%. the transport budget by 15%. and the p
problems as opposed to be worrying about the next election. >> you say republicans have a hard time saying yes, particularly to you. >> yeah. >> what is it about you, prosecute president, that you think is so hard to say yes to? >> you know, that's something you're probably going to have to ask them. you know, david, you follow this stuff pretty carefully. the offers that i've made to them have been so fair that a lot of democrats get mad at me. i mean, i offered to make some significant changes to our entitlement programs in order to reduce the deficit. i offered not only $1 trillion in -- over $1 trillion in spending cuts over the next ten years, but these changes would result in even more savings in the next ten years and would solve our deficit prab for a decade. they say the biggest priority is making sure we deal with the deficit in a serious way. but the way they're behaving is by saying their only priority is making sure taxes are protected on the wealthy. i think at some point what's important is that they listen to the american people. now, i think that over the next 48 hours, my
, but it's also very important to continue to go very actively in this direction. 2013 we'll see elections in germany and in italy. do you think it could lead to some sort of political stand by or quite the opposite, it could speed up the political reshaping in the eurozone? >> first of all, i think that the situation in all countries, you ever responsibility toes be taken and i am not of the opinion that there are divisions in the public opinion in any country in europe that would translate in major changes in the policies pursued. so i am confident that this historical endeavorer which is reinforcing the european union, reinforcing government, fiscal and economic governments will go on and until now, all elections in all countries and we have 17 democracies so you have perchl elections have confirmed the determination of the european to go on and to pursue their, again, historical endeavor. this is something which is very important. ten from new york, ten from, i would say, hong kong and shanghai, in from singapore. you have a difficulty to understand that underlying you have a historica
on bailouts and the need for belt tightening. but the problem is that even coming in fishs in the elections won't be enough. >> she has a very unstable combination, and in the german political system it's impossible to just dominate everything with one party so she needs a coalition partner and her current one which she would consider to be her favorite coalition partner might disappear from the political scene for one term. >> at this time the lerl doctor eelectric oral arithmetic suggests merkel's new partner after the election willing her biggest opponent shall the social democrats and their leader. that would likely signal a partial shift away from her hard line stance on europe. and more danger may lie in wait for merkel outside of the country. merkel may have steered a steady course in the euro zone, sovereign debt and banking crisis, but the problems are far from over. >> we are still in the financial crisis and we don't know what state of emergency will pop up in the next year. the global economy will be a serious problem. >> 2013 may also be the year when germany starts to feel wha
. chÁvez cannot make it, there must be fresh elections. his allies are focused on his recovery. in another hint this could be a critical moment, the new street party in caracas has been cancelled. the government has called on the country to unite in prayer instead for hugo chÁvez. >> international peace negotiations in syria urging the international community to push the government and rebels into talks. without talks, they want the country could become a failed state ruled by warlords for the -- warlords. tortured and disfigured bodies have been discovered north of damascus. at least 10 people killed and 40 others wounded, seven people were killed from the same family. bombs also incur code. a short time ago as spoke to bbc but said the attacks come at a difficult time politically for iraq. >> clearly, the most at that stands out the most is the one you mentioned south of baghdad where apparently, and normal, ordinary home was blown up and seven people were killed inside. but the other attacks have been more or less standard, attacks on security forces and shiites -- shia religious proce
in mind, it's been a pretty good year despite it being an election year, despite the fiscal cliff and ongoing problems in europe. the market has done better than it has usual done. what's changed? i think there will be continued political turmoil and slow growth but that's, particularly given valuations, may not be a bad year for equities as all. >> i'm going to add to that list having been a good year for the stock market. also had a lot of recovery in the housing market as well. do all these good things, all this progress become undone if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> i think clearly we've seen some healing in housing which is great and as has already been said we've seen some good progress over in europe and in china so that's all great. i'm neutral on equities in my allocation strategy fund, target rich funds and the reason for that is the fiscal cliff. if we go over the fiscal cliff then i think that given how lean companies are, and as slow as we're growing, we could see the economy dip back into recession and earnings estimates will have to go lower. >> the mastercard rep
a horizon of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things eco
elections coming up in february, german elections not far behind that, has to be seen whether angela merkel can survive that. does that give you cause for concern? >> there is no question about that. every election that has happened in the last two or three years, the incumbent has been evicted from office. you can worry about angela merkel, our guess is she is doing other than the rest of them and will survive, there's plenty to worry about that is what makes overall the market depressed and therefore attractive. ashley: you like the auto sector and insurance, tell us a little bit about that. >> insurance kind of our chicken way of finance. we are not comfortable with the euro banks we think the insurance companies are in much better shape, they came off of catastrophic losses last year so the p/e ratios are a little higher than they appear. not as high as they appear rather. this year or next year's estimate fairly reasonable and they mentioned a four and .5% yield roughly, it is an attractive package. it is on a worldwide upturn in consumer demand is not happening fast. like in this coun
as wide ranging as the presidential election, the fiscal cliff, jobs of the future, and even a few movie stars. we wanted to take a few minutes to highlight the best of 2012. this is the year that was, and thank you for sharing it with me. >> i wish the people had more rational conversation to collaborate to how we can make the country grow faster, create jobs and create opportunity. >> america's always thinking it's in decline. the decline is by people left, right, and center. it's almost like a publishing craze. not quite "50 shades of gray" or sexy, but, still -- >> the biggest priority for the united states right now is getting recovery going at a rate that is rapid enough to produce sustained reductions in unemployment. >> under current law, on january 1st, 2013, it's going to be a massive fiscal cliff of large spending cuts and tax increases. >> find some way to avoid the fiscal cliff, to avoid doing anything that would contract the economy now. >> does that mean extending the tax cuts? >> the real issue is not whether they should be extended for another few months. the real issue
and you will like it. you know what it reminds me of? elections have consequences. i won. it's not a nice tack to the center where i'm going to govern for all of you. are you coming back? >> i'm going to. >> the jacket is coming off, though, right? >> christmas eve and i'm celebrating. as you know, we had the tree going this weekend with the lights on. >> that's so nice. there's one other thing i sought on that thing over the weekend that you brought us that i was going do -- oh,no. did you see mitt romney did not want to run? >> i saw that. that was in the boston globe. that was a great piece worth reading. then he found out how bad things were going on his ipad. >> yeah. but maybe he didn't want to run because there were times i really kind of thought it looked like he didn't want to run. >> yeah, but towards the end, i thought he did. >> he tried hard. thanks. >> okay. >> come over here. >>> in other news, a dock worker strike on the atlantic and coast could be just days away. port operators have been negotiating with the long shoreman association since march. but the two sides are sai
back since before the election. and which have sort of gone through some phases. in a way, the markets have sort of factored in from the first immediate period following the election a big deal to resolve the situation in the u.s. is not going to happen. the lying fiscal challenges in the u.s. are not going to be resolved anytime soon. that would be a big surprise and, obviously, if it was one that appeared that didn't damage the economy, that would be enough. but i think most people are resigned to democracy and maybe this is a broader issue about western democracy. unless the markets do put governments under pressure, it's not easy to come up with such tough positions and i suspect that is going to be the case. it will be a recurring theme through the year, i suspect. >> and that's what i was going to suggest, this idea that we're going to come up with cliff after cliff after cliff, that maybe we're into a whole year of cliff diving, your expectation, let's say we get through the cliff with a baby deal. we've had still a number of economists come on this set and talk about how we cou
getting there and i am -- you can see the election as a current example is something profound happened in the last election not just because obama won but the way he won. he won in a way which really changed our ideas about who is the minority and to is the victim which is something you write about a lot. this idea that women put him in power. we had this -- the largest number of female senators we have ever had in history. we had new hampshire the most politically obsessed state in the entire country run by at matriarchy. you have to think hard about what does it mean to be a minority in this country of the so-called minorities can band together and put a president in power and what we used to think of as the patriarchy and people in power vote for another person and he doesn't get elected. we need to think hard about who is in charge when the labor movement is moving and the last thing i will say is what i want to happen after "the end of men" is not for all men to go to the moon and disappear and be happy matriarchy like new hampshire. that is not what i mean. what i would like to h
delayed provincial and local elections, and strengthening state institutions to provide much needed public services. we believe the time has come for the drc and the international community to permanently break the cycle of violence and impunity that exists in the region. today's crisis is a deep tragedy. but it also offers an opportunity to help the drc and the regent -- the region to set itself on its path toward peace and prosperity. we encouraged them to achieve the goals that we all seek. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you very much. secretary, please describe the strategic defense priorities within africa and how does the situation in the drc situation with these priorities? >> thanks for the question. a person and foremost, the prairie recently has been on counterterrorism issues. -- first and foremost, the priority recently has been on counter-terrorism issues. can you hear me now? the top priority has always been the defense of the people. we have been acutely focused on defense issues. most importantly in north africa where they have gotten the most attention. we are also keen
an election coming up soon. i don't think you'll see germany doing a lot of bailing out the rest of europe. and europe is the number one global concern to this day. if europe doesn't do well, the rest of the world economy is going to suffer. >> gregg: what about japan? is it insolvent already? >> yeah. a lot of people believe so. that will be a big story in 2014. just recently japan announced that they are going to start printed ago lot of money and last week, you saw the yen drop in value 15% which means that, if what we are company exporting to japan that just hurts our sales quite a bit because the value of their yen is less. so not able to buy as many products which is then, gregg, to hurt our stock market because a lot of our growth comes outside our borders of the united states. this is is a problem that goes directly to nks 401-k plan. >> then there is china which is the growth juggernaut but it accelerated? >> in fact the beginning of the year they are looking at double-digit growth. we're going to see 6-7% growth. china is going to be okay. they are not suffering stagflation like
. coming up, julia louis dreyfus, but first julianne moore on recreating the 2000 election in the film adaptation a game change. that's straight ahead when we return. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. >>> the book game change was itself a game changer in the role of political books. the task of adapting the pages into a compelling movie was likely a daunting
over the election of abe and his push for abe-nomics is the fact that this is a very nationalistic individual. his first term in '06 was characterized by a lot of nationalistic policies. we'll see how that plays out with respect to the ongoing debate. >> we have to take a break here. the markets are looking for some direction after fiscal cliff negotiations stall. we get the word from the nyse floor, next on what you should be watching in today's session. later on, the anti-tax man himself is here to tell us about how he feels about the latest developments in the fiscal cliff negotiations. what a wild ride here we've seen all morning long. right now the dow up about 25. >>> welcome back to "squawk on the street." i'm john harwood in washington. i want to bring you up to date on the latest of the talks between vice president biden and mitch mcconnell. there's some concern among democrats who have heard that the income threshold for tax rate increases may be going up to 400, 450, $500,000. a source familiar with the talks just phoned me to say the democrats are only considering that
in the 1970s. in 2007, she had returned to pakistan from self-imposed exile to run in the general elections. she was killed at a campaign rally. her son was picked to lead her party. >> i am thankful to the cc for imposing their trust in me as chairman of the pakistan people's party. >> reporter: but he was just 19 and studying at oxford. her husband was co-chairman of the party. he ran for president and won. now her son, at age 24, has given his first major speech at the family shrine. and his father seemed proud to launch him into political life. >> translator: his education is finished, and his training has begun. he has to stay with you, with the workers. he has to learn with you. he has to learn about pakistan, learn how to work with you, learn your thinking. >> reporter: he's still too young to run for office but will likely be a figurehead in the general elections, expected within a few months. isha sesay, cnn, atlanta. >>> and the family of nelson mandela is speaking out. >> our grandfather is great. he's doing very well. >> after rumors that mandela was close to death, family membe
elected civilian that lived in the white house. mcclellan himself toyed with the idea of. quote, i almost think if i were to win a small success now i could become teeter. he wrote to his wife. and he andy gloried in his newspaper nickname, the young napoleon. he then posed for official photographs with his hands tucked into his tunic. added cabinet meeting on new year's eve, the joint congressional committee on the conduct of the war spent more than 90 minutes asking hard questions about the situation and lincoln's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended movements bates confided. the blame he concluded lay with abraham lincoln. an excellent man wrote bates and in the main wise but he lacks will and purpose and i greatly fear he has not the power to command. over the next 12 months, the civil war became a cataclysm. the federal government became a -- in the confedera
was seen strict irbefore the elections and hand brought forward the dematte manned that might have been in the future, people wanted to bite hand guns. >> always the case. any time the debate over gun control flares up. >> does the framework of the "wall street journal" piece tell us anything new about best buy, sears? >> for sears, we have seen them cut costs, cut costs, sears and the kmart stores. it seems that this year the reckoning, the kmart operation, people have lost track of that if you send people inside kmart today, i think you basically find a relatively horrifying situation for the average consumer. i mean, really bad stores that haven't been given the proper maintenance budgets that they deserve. for -- is it life or death? no h i think for the kmart part of it, there will be some sort of reckoning. i say life or death maybe moves more into that category for radioshack that stock has just been getting pummeled. tried to adapt themselves as mobile phone retailer and margins getting killed in kind. so i think this year is sort of that moment, someone come in and do an lbo, e
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